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Avoid These Mistakes When Selling Your Home

Avoid These Mistakes When Selling Your Home

Selling your home—especially if you’ve never done it before—can be surprisingly time-consuming and emotionally challenging. Strangers will come into your home and poke around in your closets and cabinets. They will criticize a place that has probably become more than just four walls and a roof to you, and then, to top it all off, they will offer you less money than you think your home is worth.

 

With no experience and a complex, emotional transaction on your hands, it’s easy for first-time home sellers to make lots of mistakes, but with a little know-how, you can avoid many of these pitfalls altogether. Read on to find out how you can get the highest possible price for your home within a reasonable timeframe—without losing your mind. 

 

Mistake No.1: Being Emotionally Involved

Once you decide to sell your home, it can be helpful to start thinking of yourself as a businessperson and a home seller, rather than as the home’s owner. By looking at the transaction from a purely financial perspective, you’ll distance yourself from the emotional aspects of selling the property that you’ve undoubtedly created many memories in.

Also, try to remember how you felt when you were shopping for that home. Most buyers will also be in an emotional state. If you can remember that you are selling not just a piece of property but also an image, the American Dream and a lifestyle, you’ll be more likely to put in the extra effort of staging and perhaps some minor remodeling to get top dollar for your home. These changes in appearance will not only help the sales price but also help you create that emotional distance because the home will look less familiar.

 

Mistake No.2: Not Hiring an Agent

Although real estate agents command a hefty commission (usually 5 to 6% of the sale price of your home), it’s probably ill-advised to try to sell your home on your own, especially if you haven’t done it before. A good agent will help you set a fair and competitive selling price for your home that will increase your odds of a quick sale. An agent can also help tone down the emotion of the process by interacting with potential buyers so you don’t have to and by eliminating tire-kickers who only want to look at your property but have no intention of writing an offer.

An agent will also have more experience negotiating home sales than you do, potentially helping you get more money than you could on your own. Further, if any problems crop up during the process—and they commonly do—an experienced professional will be there to handle them for you. Finally, agents are familiar with all the paperwork and pitfalls involved in real estate transactions and can help make sure the process goes smoothly. 

 

Mistake No.3: Minimizing What Agents Do

Some people do sell their homes themselves. You’ll need to do your research on recently sold properties in your area and properties currently on the market to determine an attractive selling price, keeping in mind that most home prices have an agent’s commission factored in and you may have to discount your price as a result.

You’ll be responsible for your own marketing, so you’ll want to make sure to get your home on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) in your geographic area to reach the widest number of buyers. Also, you’ll be the one showing the house and negotiating the sale with the buyer’s agent, which can be time-consuming, stressful and emotional for some people.

If you’re forgoing an agent, consider hiring a real estate attorney to help you with the finer points of the transaction and the escrow process. Even with attorney’s fees, though, selling a home yourself can save you thousands. If the buyer has an agent, they’ll expect to be compensated. This cost is typically covered by the seller, so you’ll still need to pay 1 to 3% of the home’s sale price to the buyer’s agent.

 

Mistake No.4: Setting an Unrealistic Price

Whether you’re working with an agent or going it alone, setting the right asking price is key. Remember the comparable market analysis you or your agent did when you bought your home to determine a fair offering price? Buyers will do this for your home, too, so as a seller, you should be one step ahead of them.

Absent a housing bubble, overpriced homes generally don’t sell. Don’t worry too much about setting a price that’s on the low side because, in theory, this will generate multiple offers and bid the price up to the home’s true market value. In fact, underpricing your home can be a strategy to generate extra interest in your listing. And you can always refuse an offer that’s too low.

 

Mistake No.5: Expecting the Asking Price

Any smart buyer will negotiate, and if you want to complete the sale, you may have to play ball. Most people want to list their homes at a price that will attract buyers while still leaving some breathing room for negotiations—the opposite of the underpricing strategy described above. This can work too and will allow the buyer to feel like he or she is getting good value while allowing you to get the amount of money you need from the sale.

Of course, whether you end up with more or less than your asking price will likely depend not just on your pricing strategy but on whether you’re in a buyer’s marketor a seller’s market and on how well you have staged and modernized your home.

 

Mistake No.6: Selling During Winter Months

Winter, especially around the holidays, is typically a slow time of year for home sales. People are busy with social engagements, and the cold weather makes it more appealing just to stay home. Because fewer buyers are likely to be looking, it may take longer to sell your home, and you may not get as much money. However, you can take some consolation in knowing that while there may not be as many active buyers, there also won’t be as many competing sellers, which can work to your advantage.

 

Mistake No.7: Skimping on Listing Photos

So many buyers look for homes online these days, and so many of those homes have photos, that you’ll be doing yourself a real disservice if you don’t offer photos as well. At the same time, there are so many poor photos of homes for sale that if you do a good job, it will set your listing apart and help generate extra interest.

Good photos should be crisp and clear, should be taken during the day when there is plenty of natural light available, and should showcase your home’s best assets. Consider using a wide-angle lens if possible — this will allow you to give potential buyers a better idea of what entire rooms look like. Ideally, hire a professional real estate photographer to get top quality results instead of just letting your agent take snapshots on a phone. Consider adding a video tour or 360-degree view to further enhance your listing.

 

Mistake No.8: Not Carrying Proper Insurance

Your lender may have required you to acquire a homeowners insurance policy, but if not, you’ll want to make sure you’re insured in case a viewer has an accident on the premises and tries to sue you for damages. You also want to make sure there are not any obvious hazards at the property or that you take steps to mitigate them (keeping the children of potential buyers away from your pool and getting your dogs out of the house during showings, for example).

 

Mistake No.9: Hiding Major Problems

Any problem with the property will be uncovered during the buyer’s inspection, so there’s no use hiding it. Either fix the problem ahead of time, price the property below market value to account for the problem, or list the property at a normal price but offer the buyer a credit to fix the problem.

Realize that if you don’t fix the problem in advance, you may eliminate a fair number of buyers who want a turnkey home. Having your home inspected before listing it is a good idea if you want to avoid costly surprises once the home is under contract. Further, many states have disclosure rules. Many require sellers to disclose known problems about their home if buyers directly ask, while others decree that sellers must voluntarily disclose certain issues.

 

Mistake No.10: Not Preparing for the Sale 

Sellers who do not clean and stage their homes are throwing money down the drain. If you can’t afford to hire a professional, that’s okay, there are many things you can do on your own. Failing to do these things will not only reduce your sale price but may also prevent you from getting a sale at all. For example, if you haven’t attended to minor issues like a broken doorknob, a potential buyer may wonder whether the house has larger, costlier issues that haven’t been addressed either.

 

Have a friend or agent, someone with a fresh pair of eyes, point out areas of your home that need work. Because of your familiarity with the home, you may have become immune to its trouble spots. Decluttering, cleaning thoroughly, putting a fresh coat of paint on the walls and getting rid of any odors will also help you make a good impression on buyers.

 

Mistake No.11: Not Accommodating Buyers

If someone wants to view your house, you need to accommodate this person, even if it is inconvenient for you. And yes, you have to clean and tidy the house before every single visit. A buyer won’t know and care if your house was clean last week. It’s a lot of work, but stay focused on the prize.

 

Mistake No.12: Selling to Unqualified Buyers

It’s more than reasonable to expect a buyer to bring a pre-approval letter from a mortgage lender (or proof of funds for cash purchases) showing that he or she has the money to buy the home. Signing a contract with a buyer whose purchase of your home is contingent on the sale of his or her own property may also put you in a serious bind if you need to close by a particular date.

 

The Bottom Line

Even if you make none of these mistakes when selling your home, it’s best to prepare mentally and financially for less-than-ideal scenarios. The house may sit on the market for far longer than you expect, especially in a declining market. If you can’t find a buyer in time, you may end up trying to pay two mortgages, having to rent your home out until you can find a buyer, or in dire situations, in foreclosure. However, if you avoid the costly mistakes listed here, you’ll be a long way toward putting your best foot forward and achieving that seamless, lucrative sale every home seller hopes for. 

 

Original Article By Amy Fontinelle    

©2019 INVESTOPEDIA 

Distributed by .DASH

 

https://www.investopedia.com/articles/mortgages-real-estate/08/home-seller-mistakes-selling-house.asp

Millennials & Real Estate – When To Buy!

 

Samantha Suckno and Jason Ortiz bought their first home in Rockaway, NJ.

Source: Samantha Suckno

Many Millennials Say Buying A Home May Finally Be Within Reach

Samantha Suckno and Jason Ortiz bought their first home in Rockaway, NJ.Source: Samantha Suckno

Samantha Suckno says knew she wanted to start to build a life with her soon-to-be husband in a home they owned.So she and her fiance, Jason Ortiz, came up with a plan: move into a rental property together, pay down their bills and start saving. The couple also cut back on traveling.“The money I was using to pay for my own rent was basically going into paying off credit card debt,” the 31-year-old said, noting that when she was on her own she “had been living paycheck to paycheck.”Suckno and Ortiz, 37, were married in February 2018. In July, they bought their first home together in Rockaway, New Jersey.Their decision to make the leap into homeownership may be part of a growing trend.A new study by Chase Home Lending found 52% of millennial first-time homebuyers feel financially ready to buy a home. And 70% said they are willing to cut back on extra-curricular activities, like shopping, movie-going and a spa visit, once a month to make it happen. The bank surveyed 1,000 first-time U.S. homebuyers, ages 22 to 38, in March.close dialogAre you spending smart with credit?Take our quiz and find outGoMillennials currently make up the largest share of homebuyers, according to the National Association of Realtors. However, the generation’s homeownership rate is lower than that of their parents and grandparents at the same age, a report by the policy research group Urban Institute found.To be sure, they are facing increasing hurdles in today’s real estate market. Prices are rising and the number of the homes on the market are shrinking. According to Zillow, starter home prices have increased by 57.3% over the last five years, while inventory has dropped by 23.3%.

They also have things like student loan debt and delayed marriage to thank for the late start. Additionally, older millennials graduated during the last recession and witnessed the housing crisis.“They went through a process where renting seemed like a better idea and a safer outcome,” said Sean Grzebin, head of consumer originations at Chase Home Lending.Then there is the desire they have for a more balanced life that includes spending money on traveling and going out to dinner, he added.However, now “they are starting to realize the importance of homeownership and the necessity to have some balance in terms of sacrificing those things,” Grzebin said.In fact, Suckno said she was among the last of her friends, fellow millennials, to buy a home.But just because they are entering the housing market doesn’t mean millennials are free from buyer’s remorse.A survey of 10,000 homeowners and renters from Zillow found that 81% of young homeowners between the age of 18 and 34 years old had at least one regret about their home, compared with 65% of those 55 years and older. Most of those younger buyers’ regrets had to do with their mortgage payments and type of mortgage they have.

https://www.cnbc.com/video/2019/05/02/these-are-the-top-housing-markets-for-millennials.html

Sarah Mikhitarian, senior economist at Zillow, said that may have to do with their inexperience with the homebuying process.However, at the end of the day, they generally were still happy with their purchase.“As millennials make the home their own with their furniture or renovations, it’s a space for them to come home to at the end of the day and provide the peace or enjoyment that they were looking for all along,” Mikhitarian said.As for Suckno, she has no regrets, although there have been some unexpected expenses along the way — like a basement renovation that went way over budget.“I wish we could have done it sooner — 100%— just because it is our own,” she said.“You take pride in everything you’ve done to your own home that you are building equity in.”

Original Article By Michelle Fox©2019 CNBC LLCDistributed by CNBC, LLC

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/05/29/millennials-are-ready-to-make-lifestyle-changes-to-buy-a-home.html

5 Tips for First-Time Homebuyers

You’ve decided to go for it. You know mortgage rates are enticingly low. Buying a home can be thrilling and nerve-wracking at the same time, especially for first-time homebuyers. It’s difficult to know exactly what to expect.
Take these five steps to make the process go more smoothly.
Check Your Credit
Your credit score is among the most important factors when it comes to qualifying for a mortgage. “In addition, the standards are higher in terms of what score you need and how it affects the cost of the loan,” says Mike Winesburg, formerly a mortgage planner with McKinley Carter Wealth Services in Wheeling, W. Va. Scour your credit reports for mistakes, unpaid accounts or collection accounts. Just because you pay everything on time every month doesn’t mean your credit is stellar. The amount of credit you’re using relative to your available credit limit, or your credit utilization ratio, can sink a credit score. The lower the utilization rate, the higher your score will be. Ideally, first-time homebuyers would have a lot of credit available, with less than a third of it used. Repairing damaged credit takes time. If you think your credit may need work, begin the repair process at least six months before shopping for a home.
Evaluate Assets and Liabilities
A first-time homebuyer should have a good idea of money they owe and money they have coming in.
“If I were a first-time homebuyer and I wanted to do everything right, I would probably try to track my spending for a couple of months to see where my money was going,” Winesburg says. Additionally, buyers should have an idea of how lenders will view their income, and that requires becoming familiar with the basics of mortgage lending. For instance, some professionals, such as the self-employed or straight-commission salesperson, may have a more difficult time getting a loan than others. The self-employed or independent contractor will need a solid two years’ earnings history to show, according to Winesburg.
Organize Documents
When applying for mortgages, you must document income and taxes. Typically, mortgage lenders will request two recent pay stubs, the previous two years’ W-2s, tax returns and the past two months of bank statements—every page, even the blank ones.
“Why it has to be every single last page, I don’t know. But that is what they want to see. I think they look for nonsufficient funds or odd money in or out,” says Floyd Walters, owner of BWA Mortgage in La Canada Flintridge, Calif.
Qualify Yourself
Ideally, you already know how much you can afford to spend before the mortgage lender tells you how much you qualify for.
By calculating debt-to-income ratio and factoring in a down payment, you will have a good idea of what you can afford, both upfront and monthly. Though there’s not a fixed debt-to-income ratio that lenders require, the standard dictates that no more than 28 percent of your gross monthly income be devoted to housing costs. This percentage is called the front-end ratio.
The back-end ratio shows what portion of income covers all monthly debt obligations. Lenders prefer the back-end ratio to be 36 percent or less, but some borrowers get approved with back-end ratios of 45 percent or higher.
Figure Out Your Down Payment
It takes effort to scrape together the down payment. There are programs that can assist buyers with qualifying incomes and situations.
“I’ve helped arrange assistance loans for $10,000, which are interest- and payment-free, and forgivable after five years. Although considered a loan, they’re more like grants. Other programs can provide up to $40,000 interest-free,” Winesburg says. Finally, speak with mortgage lenders when you’re starting the process. Check with friends, co-workers and neighbors to find out which lenders they enjoyed working with and ask them questions about the process and what other steps first-time homebuyers should take.
Original article By Sheyna Steiner
©2017 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC
https://www.hourdetroit.com/real-estate/5-tips-for-first-time-homebuyers/

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